Tag Archives: garlic

Cool New Purchase!

IMG_3500

When your last name is Cherry and you’ve written a book on garlic and you see a 19th-century French copper mold decorated with cherries and garlic, you pretty much have to buy it.  You’ll be pleased to learn that I’m not going to give you a recipe for cherry-garlic pie but rather a simple dish for asparagus, cherry tomatoes, and garlic.  It’s adapted from a recipe by Emeril Lagasse.  For more flavor (and calories), sprinkle some feta cheese on top.

Roasted Asparagus with Cherry Tomatoes and Garlic

2 lb. pencil asparagus
2 c. cherry tomatoes, washed and stemmed
12 cloves garlic, peeled and smashed
1/4 c. extra-virgin olive oil
1 t. coarse or flake salt (I like Maldon)
1/2 t. freshly ground black pepper
1/4 c. balsamic vinegar

Preheat oven to 400 degrees.

Place asparagus, tomatoes, and garlic in a large bowl; drizzle with olive oil and season with salt and pepper. Toss to combine. Transfer to a large rimmed baking sheet and drizzle with balsamic vinegar.

Transfer to oven and roast until asparagus are tender and tomatoes begin to caramelize, 20 to 25 minutes. Serve hot or at room temperature. Sprinkle with feta just before serving, if using.

Happy Birthday Dr. Seuss!

Grinch Who Hash copy

The great Dr. Seuss was born on this date in 1904. In my favorite Dr. Seuss story, “How the Grinch Stole Christmas,” he wrote, “You’re a monster, Mr. Grinch, Your heart’s an empty hole, Your brain is full of spiders, You’ve got garlic in your soul, Mr. Grinch.” Celebrate with this garlicky rendition of “Who Hash” aka Garlic Hashed Potatoes. It’s great as an accompaniment to eggs or as a savory side dish.

Garlic “Who Hash”
2 Yukon Gold potatoes, shredded
Salt and pepper, to taste
6 cloves garlic, minced

Preheat oven to 375° F.

Rinse the shredded potatoes and pat them dry.

Spread the shredded potatoes on a baking sheet lined with parchment paper or a Silpat mat. Sprinkle with salt and pepper. Bake for 10 minutes. Remove from the oven and toss the potatoes with the minced garlic, then spread them back on the mat. Return them to the oven and bake 5 more minutes.

Garlic: An Edible Biography is Here!!!

Garlic Book Cover

Garlic: An Edible Biography is on bookshelves today. In its honor, here’s my favorite recipe from the book: Garlic Brittle and Chocolate Chip Cookies. I made them in London and they were very popular. These cookies don’t scream “garlic;” instead, the flavor comes on gradually making the garlic a “mystery” ingredient. The extra sugar from the brittle chunks makes these cookies spread a bit, so be sure to leave plenty of room between them as they bake.

Garlic-Pecan Brittle
The trick with a brittle is to have everything ready and at the right temperature before you start cooking the brittle. Cooked sugar is always extremely hot, so be sure to protect your hands and arms and always pour away from yourself. This brittle makes a great confection on its own, plain or dipped in chocolate, or sprinkled over ice cream. Makes about 12 ounces

½ cup garlic cloves, blanched and peeled
1 cup sugar
¼ cup corn syrup
2 tbsp butter, room temperature
1 tsp vanilla
¼ tsp salt
1 cup pecans, toasted and chopped

1. Line a baking sheet with a nonstick silpat, parchment, or wax paper.

2. Chop the garlic coarsely and set aside.

3. Combine the sugar and corn syrup in a large, heavy-bottomed saucepan over medium heat. Stir until the sugar dissolves, about 5 minutes. Continue to boil until the mixture reaches 300°F (hard crack stage) on a candy thermometer and is a rich golden brown.

4. Immediately remove from the heat and add butter, vanilla and salt, stirring until the butter melts and is completely emulsified into the sugar. Add the garlic and pecans and stir to coat completely.

5. Working quickly and carefully, scrape the hot mixture onto the prepared baking sheet. Tilt the pan so it flows into an even layer and after it has cooled for a minute or two, use a metal or silicon spatula to spread it into an even layer. Let the brittle cool completely, at least 1 hour, and then break into chunks.

NOTE: Blanch the garlic to remove any bitterness. Put desired amount of garlic in a pot and cover with cold water.Bring water to a boil. Once water boils, strain garlic and add it back to the pot. Cover with cold water, and repeat previous steps for a total of three times.

Garlic Brittle and Chocolate Chip Cookies
Makes 2 ½ dozen cookies

2 1/2 cups all-purpose flour
1/2 tsp baking soda
1 tsp salt
1 cup (2 sticks) butter, softened
3/4 cup granulated sugar
3/4 cup packed brown sugar
1 tsp vanilla extract
2 large eggs
2 cups semi-sweet chocolate chips
1 cup chopped Garlic-Pecan Brittle

1. Preheat oven to 375°F.

2. Whisk together the flour, baking soda and salt in bowl.

3. Beat butter, granulated sugar, brown sugar and vanilla extract in a stand mixer with the paddle attachment on medium speed until creamy, about 2 minutes. Add the eggs one at a time, beating well after each addition and scraping down the bowl to blend evenly.

4. By hand or on low speed, blend in flour mixture. Stir in morsels and garlic brittle.

5. Drop by rounded tablespoon onto ungreased baking sheets, leaving at least 3 inches between the cookies.

6. Bake until golden brown, 10 to 12 minutes. Cool the cookies on the baking sheets for 2 minutes before transferring to wire racks to cool completely.

Garlic: An Edible Biography (8 days and counting!)

Yogi Berra

According to a 1956 ad for Kraft’s then-new Italian Dressing, Yogi Berra said it “sure makes swell salads” thanks to “rare herbs, fresh spices and just the right touch of garlic.” Although Berra (ne Lawrence Peter) admitted that he was dubbed Yogi by a teammate who saw him sitting serenely with his arms and legs crossed and said he sat like a yogi, he once told reporters that he had no idea why he’d been dubbed Yogi and said “I had a brother they called ‘Garlic’ and his name was Mike.”

Berra also said, “You better cut the pizza in four pieces because I’m not hungry enough to eat six.” Since I recently shared a salad dressing recipe, here’s a recipe for Pizza Escarole, a Neapolitan dish is most commonly served on Christmas Eve as it’s meatless.

Pizza Escarole

Makes 6 servings

1 lb pizza dough*
2 lb escarole (2 heads), separated into leaves
2 tbsp olive oil
3 garlic cloves, peeled and sliced thin
10 black olives, pitted and sliced
One 2-ounce can flat anchovies, chopped
1/2 cup pine nuts
1/2 cup dark raisins
1 tbsp salted capers, rinsed and drained (See note below)
Freshly ground black pepper

1. Preheat oven to 400°F.

2. Bring a large pot of salted water to a boil. Add the escarole, stir to submerge completely, and simmer until tender, about 5 minutes. Drain in a colander and rinse with cool water. When the escarole is cool enough to handle, squeeze it well to remove excess water and then chop coarsely.

3. Heat the olive oil in a sauté pan over medium-high heat. Add the garlic, olives, anchovies, and pine nuts and sauté, stirring frequently, until the garlic begins to turn golden, about 1 minute. Add the escarole and cook uncovered, stirring frequently, until very hot and flavorful and most of the liquid is cooked away, about 10 minutes. Stir in the raisins and capers. Season with pepper. Let the filling cool to room temperature while preparing the dough.

4. Divide the dough into two pieces; one piece should be about two-thirds of the dough and the other about one-third. Roll the larger piece out into a 16-inch round and transfer it to a 12-inch round baking dish or pan to line the bottom and sides. Fill the dough with the escarole mixture. Roll out the remaining dough into a 12-inch round for the top crust. Pinch the edges of the dough together to seal the top and bottom together.

Note: Capers preserved in salted have a more delicate, flowery flavor than those preserved in brine but those can be substituted if necessary. (The best salted capers come from the Sicilian island of Pantelleria.)

Garlic: An Edible Biography “T minus 9”

Garlic Cocktail

Flu and cold season is coming so I thought I’d offer some garlic remedies. Garlic vodka is a popular anti-flu remedy in Russia. To make it, a bulb of garlic is finely chopped and added to a pint of vodka. The drink should be stirred up twice a day and infused for at least 21 days. This is not a beverage but a medicine and it’s recommended that those afflicted take 10 to 20 drops of garlic vodka, twice a day.

Another popular cold remedy is garlic-honey syrup. (Honey soothes the throat and reduces coughing.) Chop up a whole bulb of garlic and place it in a glass jar. Cover with half a cup of raw honey. Let sit for at least three (but preferably twenty-four) hours. Take one teaspoon of the syrup every hour, as needed. (If the syrup is too strong for your taste, add some soy sauce and you have a lovely marinade for chicken or meat.)

Photo Credit: 11points.com

Garlic: An Edible Biography “T minus 11”

Heston Blumenthal

Heston Blumenthal (photo above), the chef of The Fat Duck in Bray, Berkshire, UK, is known for his molecular gastronomy. He also pioneered flavor pairing of complimentary but unique ingredients. One of his pairings is garlic and coffee. This roasted garlic ice cream with a coffee-garlic swirl was inspired by that pairing.

Roasted Garlic and Coffee Ice Cream
2 cups cream
1 cup milk
2 heads garlic, roasted and pureed
1/4 cup dark roast coffee beans
2 tbsp honey
4 large egg yolks
1/2 cup sugar
1 tsp vanilla extract
1 cup coarsely chopped Garlic-Coffee Brittle (see Below)

1. Combine the cream, milk, garlic, coffee, and honey in saucepan over medium heat. Bring to a simmer and then remove from the heat, cover, and let steep for 1 hour. Strain into a clean saucepan and return to a simmer over medium heat.

2. Mix egg yolks, sugar, and vanilla in bowl. Whisk a ladleful of the garlic-cream mixture into the yolks until smooth. Return this to the saucepan and simmer until the mixture has thickened enough to coat the back of a wooden spoon, about 6 minutes. Strain through a wire mesh sieve into a bowl. Cool to room temperature and then refrigerate in a covered container for at least 8 and up to 24 hours.

3. Freeze in an ice cream maker according to the manufacturer’s directions. Transfer to a bowl and fold in the garlic-coffee brittle. Pack into freezer containers and let the ice cream ripen in the freezer for at least 3 hours before serving. If the ice cream has been frozen longer than 6 hours, transfer it to the refrigerator for 30 minutes before serving.

Garlic-Coffee Brittle
The trick with a brittle is to have everything ready and at the right temperature before you start cooking the brittle. Cooked sugar is always extremely hot, so be sure to protect your hands and arms and always pour away from yourself.

Makes about 12 ounces

½ cup garlic cloves, blanched and peeled
1 cup sugar
¼ cup corn syrup
2 tbsp butter, room temperature
1 tsp vanilla
¼ tsp salt
1/3 cup coarsely cracked dark roast or espresso coffee beans.

1. Line a baking sheet with a nonstick silpat, parchment, or wax paper.

2. Chop the garlic coarsely and set aside.

3. Combine the sugar and corn syrup in a large, heavy-bottomed saucepan over medium heat. Stir until the sugar dissolves, about 5 minutes. Continue to boil until the mixture reaches 300°F (hard crack stage) on a candy thermometer and is a rich golden brown.

4. Immediately remove from the heat and add butter, vanilla and salt, stirring until the butter melts and is completely emulsified into the sugar. Add the garlic and coffee beans and stir to coat completely.

5. Working quickly and carefully, scrape the hot mixture onto the prepared baking sheet. Tilt the pan so it flows into an even layer and after it has cooled for a minute or two, use a metal or silicon spatula to spread it into an even layer. Let the brittle cool completely, at least 1 hour, and then break into chunks.

Garlic: An Edible Biography “T minus 12”

Garlic Card

The above picture is from a greeting card I picked up in London. (The card can be personalized which is why it says “Name,” but you get the gist.)

As George Orwell once wrote of his countrymen: ”England and the English as a rule, they will refuse even to sample a foreign dish, they regard such things as garlic and olive oil with disgust, life is unlivable to them unless they have tea and puddings.” British vacationers who visited Spain in the 1950s and 1960s would take over the kitchens of their hotels in order to make traditional British foods like Shepherd’s Pie because they were so appalled with the local food in which everything was, horror of horrors, swimming in garlic.

Today, tapas restaurants are popular in London and this simple shrimp recipe, from the book, is one of my favorites. Serve it with crusty bread to soap up the “swimming in garlic” juices.

Gambas al Ajillo

Makes 4 appetizer serving or 2 main course servings

4 oz olive oil
4 garlic cloves, finely minced
1 tsp red pepper flakes
1 lb shrimp, peeled and deveined
1/4 cup cognac
1 tbsp lemon juice
1 tsp paprika
Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper to taste
1 tbsp chopped fresh parsley

1. Heat the oil in a sauté pan over medium heat. Add the garlic and red pepper flakes and sauté, stirring frequently, until garlic is fragrant, about 1 minute.

2. Increase the heat to high and immediately add the shrimp, cognac, lemon juice, and paprika. Sauté, stirring frequently, until the shrimp turn pink and the edges curl, about 3 minutes. Season to taste with salt and freshly ground black pepper.

3. Serve the shrimp on heated appetizer plates topped with the pan juices spooned over the shrimp and sprinkled with parsley.